Just Published: Can Human Rights Law Support Access to Communication Technology?

Summary: Human rights scrutiny is a necessary component of any effort to ensure that communication technology can be effectively adopted and used. This is particularly true when the means of communication are shut down during a democratic upheaval in one country or cut off for 10 minutes on a television set in another.

The author proposes a model to solve dissemination and access problems based on the case law of the European Court of Human Rights. While Autronic AG v. Switzerland stimulates the market to support innovation and dissemination of technology, Khurshid Mustafa and Tarzibachi v. Sweden supports the adoption of that technology without unjustified restriction by the state or private individuals. Together these cases can be interpreted as sending a signal to all innovators, disseminators and users, that no matter what type of communication technology is used, there exists a general right of access to all forms of information.

The legally inclined may wish to read the orginal article.


Read This: The Right to Receive Information

For a detailed discussion of the right to receive information, which is a subset of the right to freedom of speech, read Robin’s earlier article.

Learn More About the European Court

The European Court of Human Rights oversees the human rights of 800 million Europeans. The Court’s judgments are legally binding on 47 European countries. It is not to be confused with the European Court of Justice which enforces European Union law on the 27 countries which comprise the EU.


Harvest of Shame Revisited

Seminar: Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 13.15 to 16.00. Room 22.1.49 at University of Copenhagen, Njalsgade 128.

Each year approximately 7,000 migrant farmworkers from Latin America, Haiti and the American South, pick apples, peaches and cherries in Southcentral Pennsylvania. Many are unable to break out of the poverty cycle. Come learn why America’s farmworkers remain the poorest of the poor and hear about two other case studies of migration and il(legality).


See Harvest of Shame

See the original “Harvest of Shame,” a CBS special on migrant farmworkers.  Sadly, the cycle of poverty has not changed much.


About Students’ Corner

Students’ Corner allows university students to voice their opinions on issues that they feel passionately about and have researched in depth. All are welcome to submit an idea for a piece by clicking on the contact tab and filling out the form. Kindly remember that the viewpoints expressed are those of the student only and that any mistakes remain their own.


Learn More About Andreas Lauritzen

Andreas is writing his masters on U.S. health care reform at Copenhagen Business School in Denmark. Last semester, he conducted research at U.C. Berkeley’s School of Public Health and also kept tabs on the presidential election.